Politics Politics

Demonstrators march in the snow outside the White House during a rally against the Supreme Court's decision five years ago in favor of Citizens United, which allows private citizens and corporations to make unlimited donations for political campaigns. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Humorist Will Rogers takes to the speaker's stand at the Democratic National Convention June 29, 1932. AP hide caption

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AP

Will Rogers Helped Popularize Radio With Pointed Humor

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Republican political operative Tyler Harber admitted in federal court to illegally coordinating between a campaign and superPAC. He was sentenced to two years in prison and two years' probation. Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common hide caption

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Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common

Pressed For Time? Try Hiring A Body Double

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Carlton Scott pays $266.99 per month for his subsidized health insurance plan. He worries he and his neighbors would lose their insurance without the subsidy. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

What's At Stake If Supreme Court Eliminates Your Obamacare Subsidy

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Declared and potential candidates are already in New Hampshire. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and others spoke at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit this week in Nashua. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Advice For Beleaguered Battleground State Residents: Leave Town

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Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich committed suicide following political attacks during his campaign for governor. His press secretary, Spence Jackson, committed suicide just one month later. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Suicides By Missouri Politicians Raise Questions About State Ethics

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Chevron Corp. supported several candidates in Richmond, Calif., where the company has been hoping to modernize a large oil refinery, seen here in 2010. None of the Chevron-backed candidates were elected. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Among outside groups — that is, not candidates or party committees — more than half of this cycle's political ads are financed by secret donors. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

This Political Ad Was Paid For By — Oh, Never Mind

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Scott Hildebrand, a Democrat, and Mike Jansen, a Republican, are competing to be the new sheriff in Campbell County, Ky., but they're also abiding by an agreement to keep their race clean. Images courtesy of the candidates hide caption

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Images courtesy of the candidates