Duane "Dewey" Clarridge, a CIA veteran, speaks in May 2007 during an Arkansas Committee on Foreign Relations luncheon in Little Rock, Ark. The retired spy criticized the CIA's leadership and said a lack of human intelligence had led to mistakes in Iraq, Iran and North Korea. Mike Wintroath/AP hide caption

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Russia's Vladimir Putin makes a speech in 2009 after receiving an award in Dresden, Germany, where he served as a KGB officer during the Cold War. Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spy Vs. Spies: Why Deciphering Putin Is So Hard For U.S. Intelligence

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Gen. Michael Hayden, the former head of the National Security Agency and the CIA, testifies before Congress last August. In an interview with NPR, Hayden says the intelligence agencies, not the White House, were responsible for getting it wrong when they concluded that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction prior to the U.S. invasion in 2003. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Hayden: Blame Intel Agencies, Not White House, For Getting Iraq Wrong

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CIA Director John Brennan made this case against encryption on Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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After Paris Attacks, Encrypted Communication Is Back In Spotlight

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CIA Director John Brennan listens during a news conference at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., in December 2014. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Talking Point Or Proof Of Value: CIA Tactics And The 'Second Wave' Plot

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State Department Feared Torture Report Would Spark Fury. Where Is It?

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Ex-CIA Lawyer Says No One Was Misled On Torture, Abuses Were Reported

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Report Reveals Deeply Misguided Interrogation Tactics, Feinstein Says

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As Torture Report's Release Nears, CIA And Opponents Ready Responses

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Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan takes questions after addressing the Council on Foreign Relations on March 11. The CIA has proposed deleting the email of almost all employees after they leave the agency. But some critics are saying a larger portion of the email should be preserved. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The CIA Wants To Delete Old Email; Critics Say 'Not So Fast'

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A detainee is escorted in March 2002 by two Army military police at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The detainee was being led to the Joint Interrogation Facility to be interviewed by government investigators. Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A doctor gives a polio vaccine to a child at a health clinic in Baghdad last week. The CIA says it banned the use of vaccine programs as cover for spying last year — a practice health officials said had wide repercussions. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, speaks to reporters in April. She tells NPR she's "not particularly" comfortable with the CIA vetting the "Torture Report." Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks after a closed-door meeting Thursday on Capitol Hill. The panel voted to approve declassifying part of a report on Bush-era interrogations of terrorism suspects. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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