South Korean people watch a television broadcast at the Seoul Railway Station earlier this month reporting North Korea's surface-to-air missile launch. Woohae Cho/Getty Images hide caption

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A South Korean army soldier walks by a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with superimposed letters that read: "North Korea's nuclear warhead." The warhead was later jokingly dubbed "the disco bomb." Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Visitors look at the military wire fences at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea, on Feb. 14. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Breaking The North Korean Information Blockade

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A man watches a television showing news coverage of the reported execution of North Korea's defense minister, Hyon Yong Chol, at a railway station in Seoul on Wednesday. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People watch a TV news program showing Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's younger sister, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, in November. She has reportedly married the son of the ruling party secretary. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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'The Interview,' The Hack, And The Movie Studio Dealing With The Fallout

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James Franco (left) and Seth Rogen in The Interview. The North Korean dictator promised "merciless counter-measures" if this film was released. Ed Araquel/AP hide caption

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North Korea's Cyber Skills Get Attention Amid Sony Hacking Mystery

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He's one of a kind: North Koreans cannot name their children Jong Un, and those who already share Kim Jong Un's name must change it, according to a newly confirmed directive from the country's government. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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A photo released Monday by the Rodong Sinmun, newspaper of the ruling Workers' Party, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walking with a cane as he visits a residential area in Pyongyang. Rodong Sinmun/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Balloons launched by North Korean defectors carry anti-Pyonyang propaganda along with U.S. dollar notes and DVDs into North Korea near the demilitarized zone. Kim Chul-soo/EPA/Landov hide caption

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North Korea's National Defense Commission Vice Chairman Hwang Pyong So, middle, waves as the country's athletes march at the end of the Asian Games. He's flanked by Workers Party Secretary Choe Ryong Hae, right, and South Korea's Kim Kwan-jin, left, national security adviser to South Korea's president. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and Kim's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, circled in red, at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea on Dec. 3. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Before their split: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and his uncle, Jang Song Thaek, in February 2012. Earlier this month, Jang was executed. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Before their split: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and his uncle, Jang Song Thaek, in February 2012. Earlier this month, Jang was executed. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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