This undated picture released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Aug. 4 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un delivering a speech at the April 25 House of Culture in Pyongyang. KCNA Via KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KCNA Via KNS/AFP/Getty Images

Diego, a tortoise of the endangered Chelonoidis hoodensis subspecies from Española Island, is seen in a breeding centre at the Galapagos National Park on Santa Cruz Island. RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images

High Schools In Texas Spend Big Bucks On Football Stadiums

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Japan meteorological agency officer Gen Aoki displays seismic readings that are apparently a result of a nuclear weapons test in North Korea on Friday morning. North Korea later confirmed it had conducted its fifth nuclear test. Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Conducts Its 5th Test Of Nuclear Weapon

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A North Korean man reads a local newspaper on Sunday with an image of leader Kim Jong Un. Kim said during a critical ruling party congress that his country will not use its nuclear weapons first unless its sovereignty is invaded, state media reported. Kim Kwan Hyon/AP hide caption

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Kim Kwan Hyon/AP

N. Korea Wants Economic And Nuclear Expansion, But One Undercuts The Other

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A man in South Korea watches a news broadcast Friday showing file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. Speaking at a major gathering in North Korea, Kim declared "great success" in the country's recent nuclear test and a rocket launch. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

This Weekend, Kim Jong Un Will Be Heard, Unlike His More Elusive Father

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This undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) inspecting a catfish farm at an undisclosed location in North Korea. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

Joking About A North Korean Cooking Show Just Isn't Funny

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South Korean people watch a television broadcast at the Seoul Railway Station earlier this month reporting North Korea's surface-to-air missile launch. Woohae Cho/Getty Images hide caption

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Woohae Cho/Getty Images

A South Korean army soldier walks by a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with superimposed letters that read: "North Korea's nuclear warhead." The warhead was later jokingly dubbed "the disco bomb." Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Visitors look at the military wire fences at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea, on Feb. 14. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Breaking The North Korean Information Blockade

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A man watches a television showing news coverage of the reported execution of North Korea's defense minister, Hyon Yong Chol, at a railway station in Seoul on Wednesday. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

People watch a TV news program showing Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's younger sister, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, in November. She has reportedly married the son of the ruling party secretary. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

'The Interview,' The Hack, And The Movie Studio Dealing With The Fallout

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James Franco (left) and Seth Rogen in The Interview. The North Korean dictator promised "merciless counter-measures" if this film was released. Ed Araquel/AP hide caption

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Ed Araquel/AP

North Korea's Cyber Skills Get Attention Amid Sony Hacking Mystery

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