People demonstrate in Le Havre, in northwestern France, on Thursday. A series of protests and strikes have been held over the past few months, to oppose a government plan to change France's labor law. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Graduate workers rally in 2014 at Columbia University for the ability to unionize. Tiffany Yee-Vo/Graduate Workers of Columbia-UAW hide caption

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Are Grad Students Employees? Labor Board To Again Weigh In

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Florida tomato pickers' fight for fair wages and better working conditions became a topic at Wednesday night's Democratic debate in Miami between Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Supporters cheer during a meeting Monday when the Seattle City Council voted to approve a measure that would allow ride-sharing drivers for Uber and other ride services to unionize. Matt Mills McKnight/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Fact Checking Uber On Labor Laws

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Los Angeles is a sprawling metropolis, and it was poised to become a manufacturing giant because of its unique geography. John Francis Peters for NPR & Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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What Gets Made In LA Is Way More Than Movies

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Hillary Clinton addresses the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, or AFSCME, during its National Leadership Conference in 2007. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Employee Or Contractor? New U.S. Guidelines Could Reclassify Workers

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Jessey Drewsen, 25, lives near the H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. She says she doesn't like the store, but that she goes there for cheap supplies like pens. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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When Wal-Mart Comes To Town, What Does It Mean For Workers?

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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker became a Republican political star by taking on his state's public employee unions. This week he signed a bill that would weaken private-sector unions. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Targeting Unions: Right-To-Work Movement Bolstered By Wisconsin

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Hundreds of union members rally outside the Capitol in Madison on Tuesday to oppose a Republican-led measure that would make Wisconsin a right-to-work state. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gov. Scott Walker Goes Head-To-Head With Labor Over Right-To-Work

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More than $1 billion worth of cargo passes through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach every day. Labor disputes have stalled operations for weeks now, and ships have been anchored for days. Daniel Hajek/NPR hide caption

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After Tentative Port Deal, Container Ships Still Line The Horizon

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A few trucks move along the docks at the Port of Los Angeles on Thursday. Seaports in major West Coast cities that normally are abuzz with the sound of commerce are falling unusually quiet due to an ongoing labor dispute. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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West Coast Port Closures Are Hitting Several Industries Hard

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Fast-food workers in Los Angeles march in August 2013 to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Similar protests around the country have been organized by labor unions. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Unions Have Pushed The $15 Minimum Wage, But Few Members Will Benefit

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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker spoke about taking on public employee unions, and the protests that followed, at a recent candidates forum in Iowa. He said what people may not know is that protesters — as many as 1,000 of them — showed up outside his home while his family was there. He says he also received death threats. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Gov. Scott Walker Eyes 2016, But Can He Get Past Labor's Loathing?

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