There are so many opportunities to screw up pumpkin pie. But done right, it can win friends and influence people. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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The pumpkin patch at Waldoch Farm in Lino Lakes, Minn. Kaomi Goetz for NPR hide caption

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Wing Gourds: According to Phil Rupp, president of Rupp Seeds, many years ago an Amish woman from Pennsylvania sent Phil's father, Roger Rupp, then head of the company, photos of an interesting gourd she'd developed. Roger hadn't seen anything like them, so he agreed to market them. The woman sent in some seeds, and from there Rupp's popular line of wing gourds was born. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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A tiny selection of the flavor compounds in pumpkin and pumpkin-pie spices is enough to make our brain think, "Ah, pumpkin pie!" when we drink a pumpkin pie latte. Ashley MacKinnon/Flickr hide caption

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Pumpkins for sale at the Mt. Rogers Pumpkin Patch in the a parking lot in Centreville, Va. Paul J. Richards/Getty hide caption

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