Alton Brown and "Unitasker" kitchen gadgets via YouTube hide caption

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The 'Unitasker' Kitchen Gadgets Alton Brown Loves To Loathe
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Ray Spaulding cooks apples in front of a class on cooking healthful desserts at the Portland VA withJessica Mooney, right, a clinical dietitian. About 80 percent of veterans are overweight and obese and another quarter have diabetes, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Conrad Wilson/OPB hide caption

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In Portland, A Boot Camp To Help Veterans Cook Healthier Food
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Kenji Lopez-Alt is managing culinary director of Serious Eats, author of the James Beard Award-nominated column "The Food Lab," and a columnist for Cooking Light. His first book is The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Celia Chacon, a former host of Cooking Without Looking, in the kitchen at Lighthouse of Broward, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in 2008. The television cooking show features chefs and guests who are blind or visually impaired. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Kanzi the bonobo (a species closely related to chimps) holds a pan of vegetables he cooked at the Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa, November 2011. Kanzi was taught to cook. However, a new study is the first to show that animals can acquire a cooking-like skill on their own. Laurentiu Garofeanu/Barcroft Media /Landov hide caption

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Chimps Are No Chumps: Give Them An Oven, They'll Learn To Cook
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Chef Eric David Corradetti presents dinner to residents at the Bethlehem Woods senior living facility in La Grange Park, Ill. His kitchen emphasizes fresh produce and meats and meals made from scratch. Courtesy of Unidine hide caption

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Mush No More: Retirement Home Food Gets Fresh And Local
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Drop-In Chefs Help Seniors Stay In Their Own Homes
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Celebrity chef Giada De Laurentiis during a guest appearance on ABC's The Chew last fall. She can cook rich foods and keep her trim figure, but new research suggests that's a difficult feat for amateur cooks watching along at home. Lou Rocco/ABC/Getty Images hide caption

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Do TV Cooking Shows Make Us Fat?
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Chef David Iott explains the perfect way to prepare risotto to Stanford students. Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises hide caption

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One reason cooking at home might be linked to poor health? Researchers say it could be because there are too many unhealthful baked goods coming out of the oven. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption

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Roasted pineapple Alan Richardson /Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays
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Amateur cook and writer Maureen Evans has perfected the art of tweeting a recipe in 140 characters or less. fot. Wojciech Zalewski/iStockphoto hide caption

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Tweet In The Holiday With Recipes On Twitter
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True cheddar cheese can take months — even years — to age. So Claudia Lucero created a faux-cheddar that can be made in very little time. fotolia hide caption

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How To Make A Faux Cheddar In One Hour
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