Cooking on gas and electric stoves can create indoor air pollution. The best way to avoid it is to buy a good range hood that vents outside, experts say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Fixing Stove Hoods To Keep Pollution Out Of The Kitchen

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Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

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Lump charcoal can burn hotter and can be made with specific woods that impart desirable flavors on food. Andy Ciordia/via Flickr hide caption

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For a "Cooking With Snow" class taught through Knowledge Commons DC, instructor Willie Shubert made baobing, a shaved ice dessert from China. Courtesy of Rachel Sadon hide caption

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Called a boyo or bulema, this Turkish-style pastry was traditionally made for the Jewish Shabbat. Today, boyos are mostly reserved for holidays like Hanukkah. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

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At Hanukkah, Pastry Reminds Portland Jews Of Their Mediterranean Roots

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The mortar and pestle can be found in kitchens around the world, including Thailand. In the United States, chef Tanasapamon Rohman uses the tool to grind up chili paste and pulverize rice at her Thai restaurant. Jessical Spengler/Flickr hide caption

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Real Chefs Grind It With A Mortar And Pestle

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In another era, this plate of Spanish mackerel topped with wild tamarack, basswood leaves, garlic mustard, fiddlehead ferns, and knotweed might seem cheap. Not anymore. Courtesy of Leif Hedendal hide caption

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