T.J. Plenty Chief stands in front of one of the three semitrucks owned by his company, Red Road Trucking. The trucks operate in the Fort Berthold reservation oil fields, carrying everything from gravel to pipe to water needed for drilling. His business is based on the reservation, in New Town, N.D., where he lives. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio

Upstream From Standing Rock, Tribes Balance Benefits, Risks Of Oil Industry

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

A man stands on a makeshift bridge over the Cannonball River while police officers stand on the opposite shore. Stephanie Keith/Reuters hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Reuters

Protesters, Police Still Clashing Over Disputed North Dakota Pipeline

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Law enforcement dressed in riot gear arrest protesters who are demonstrating against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. Police and National Guard moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees on Thursday. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline

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Dave Archambault, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, stands outside a federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 5. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Native Americans march on Sunday to a sacred site they say was disturbed by bulldozers working on the Dakota Access Pipeline, near an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest. Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images

A protestor is treated after being pepper sprayed by private security contractors on land being graded for the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., Sept. 3, 2016. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Following the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' recent approval of the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline, a coalition of environmental activists held a rally in New York City's Union Square Park to oppose the project. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

"Tonight's victory is not about one person; it belongs to generations of women and men who sacrificed and made this moment possible," Hillary Clinton told a cheering crowd during her primary night event Tuesday in New York City. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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Flares and electric lights on oil well pads illuminate low-hanging clouds near Watford City, North Dakota. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Oil Boom Means Sky Watchers Hoping for Starlight Just Get Stars, Lite

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In rural North Dakota, where Melanie Hoffert grew up on her family farm, discussing subjects like homosexuality and same-sex marriage is often considered taboo. Courtesy of Beacon Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Beacon Press

A North Dakota Family Breaks The Silence On Gay Marriage

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Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

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Diane Gira (left) and Valerie Nelson (right) pose with their son, Madison, in their home near Wahpeton, N.D. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

Church Ceremonies Push North Dakota Town To Grapple With Gay Rights

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The small town of Wahpeton, N.D., is one of the places where conversations on same-sex marriage are playing out in schools, churches and families. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

What We Talk About When We Talk About Gay Marriage

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Colorado educators take part in a concealed carry course in Englewood, Colo., on Nov. 8. The course is open to all state school employees. Participants who complete the training are eligible to apply for a permit to carry a handgun. MATTHEW STAVER/Landov hide caption

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MATTHEW STAVER/Landov

Colorado Pushes For Concealed Guns In K-12 Schools

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