Several hundred protesters remain camped on the North Dakota prairie in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. They have erected shelters from Army tents to teepees to wooden structures to stay warm this winter. Amy Sisk/Inside Energy hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Inside Energy

Dakota Pipeline Protesters, Nearby Residents Brace For 2017

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Jacob Brooks makes adjustments to one of the camp's many "tarpees," a winterized teepee made of tarp with a built-in chimney, designed by Paul Cheokoten Wagner. There are roughly 60 tarpees around various camps now, and Wagner has fundraised enough for another 20 more. Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR hide caption

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Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR

Despite Evacuation Orders, Pipeline Protesters Hunker Down For Winter

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Damin Radford of New Zealand overlooks the Oceti Sakowin camp on Tuesday, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

A sculpture stands at an encampment where protesters of the Dakota Access oil pipeline have been gathered for months near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Saturday. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

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James MacPherson/AP

Protesters — or water protectors, as they identify themselves — walk along Highway 1806, past a sprawling encampment at Standing Rock on Thursday. Thousands of people gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

T.J. Plenty Chief stands in front of one of the three semitrucks owned by his company, Red Road Trucking. The trucks operate in the Fort Berthold reservation oil fields, carrying everything from gravel to pipe to water needed for drilling. His business is based on the reservation, in New Town, N.D., where he lives. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio

Upstream From Standing Rock, Tribes Balance Benefits, Risks Of Oil Industry

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

A man stands on a makeshift bridge over the Cannonball River while police officers stand on the opposite shore. Stephanie Keith/Reuters hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Reuters

Protesters, Police Still Clashing Over Disputed North Dakota Pipeline

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Law enforcement dressed in riot gear arrest protesters who are demonstrating against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. Police and National Guard moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees on Thursday. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline

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Dave Archambault, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, stands outside a federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 5. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

In Fight Over N.D. Pipeline, Tribe Leader Calls For Peace And Prayers

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Native Americans march on Sunday to a sacred site they say was disturbed by bulldozers working on the Dakota Access Pipeline, near an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest. Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images

A protestor is treated after being pepper sprayed by private security contractors on land being graded for the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., Sept. 3, 2016. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images