Terrorism Terrorism

Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel in Las Vegas after a gunman in one of its rooms killed at least 58 people, with more than 500 others injured, when he opened fire on a country music concert late Sunday. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

What Is, And Isn't, Considered Domestic Terrorism

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Members of the local Muslim community gather along with relatives of young men believed responsible for the attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils to denounce terrorism in Ripoll, Spain, on Aug. 20. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

'Not A Textbook Case': Barcelona Attackers' Hometown Wonders How It Bred Terrorists

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People hold a banner reading "I am not afraid" in the Catalan language during an Aug. 26 demonstration condemning the attacks that killed 16 people last month in Barcelona. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

After Barcelona Attacks, Catalans Look Ahead To Independence Vote

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A van registered in Spain sits near the concert venue Maassilo in Rotterdam, Netherlands, where a rock concert set for Wednesday night was canceled because of a terror threat. The driver of the van, which contained some gas bottles, was arrested. Arie Kievit/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arie Kievit/AFP/Getty Images

Spain's King Felipe and Queen Letizia and other dignitaries attend a solemn Mass at Barcelona's Sagrada Familia Basilica on Sunday for the victims of the terror attacks that killed 14 people and wounded over 120 in Barcelona, Spain. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

Army Sgt. 1st Class Ikaika Erik Kang is accused of pledging allegiance to ISIS on July 8 in Honolulu. Images taken from an FBI video and provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Hawaii show him kissing an ISIS flag (left) and holding it to his forehead. AP hide caption

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AP

Devon Arthurs, 18, was arrested after leading police to the bodies of his two roommates. He told officers he killed them because they disrespected his recent conversion to Islam. Tampa Police Dept. via AP hide caption

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Tampa Police Dept. via AP

Florida Killings: Radical Islam And The Far Right, Under One Roof

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Iraqi government forces flash a victory sign while holding an upside-down Islamic State flag in western Mosul on June 9. As ISIS loses territory, it's still exhorting its supporters to keep fighting. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images

As ISIS Gets Squeezed In Syria And Iraq, It's Using Music As A Weapon

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Facebook has created new tools for trying to keep terrorist content off the site. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Facebook Uses Technology To Block Terrorist-Related Content

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A police officer in Montreal guards the front of an apartment building, where Amor Ftouhi lived before traveling to the U.S. earlier this month. Ftouhi, a Canadian resident, is suspected of stabbing an airport police officer in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. The FBI said it is investigating it as an "act of terrorism." Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

When Is It 'Terrorism'? How The Media Cover Attacks By Muslim Perpetrators

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