A pilot prepares to launch an unmanned aerial vehicle from a ground control station earlier this year. The Air Force is moving to treat psychological stress faced by remote pilots and analysts a little more like the effects of traditional warfare. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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James Harris Jackson is escorted out of a police precinct in New York on March 22. Police said Jackson, accused of fatally stabbing a black man in New York City, told investigators he traveled from Baltimore specifically to attack black people. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

People lay floral tributes to the victims of the March 22 terror attack in Parliament Square outside the Houses of Parliament in central London. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images

Keeping Calm In London, In Spite Of Terror

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Imam Johari Abdul-Malik (center), of Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Northern Virginia, speaks alongside other leaders of the Muslim community during a December 2015 news conference in Washington, D.C., about growing "Islamophobia" in the United States. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Push To Name Muslim Brotherhood A Terrorist Group Worries U.S. Offshoots

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A flower left in tribute to the victims of Wednesday's attack is seen next to the Palace of Westminster that houses the Houses of Parliament in central London. Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks Wednesday at the meeting of the Global Coalition on the Defeat of ISIS in Washington. Top officials from the 68-nation coalition are looking to increase pressure on ISIS. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Tillerson: Defeating ISIS 'No. 1 Goal' for U.S., But Others Should Do More

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When two men who were born in Germany but whose families are from Algeria and Nigeria were arrested on terrorism charges in February, police displayed items seized in a raid. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emirates passenger planes are parked at their gates at Dubai International Airport in the United Arab Emirates. The U.S. restrictions require most electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and cameras, to be placed in checked baggage on direct flights to the U.S. from eight mostly Muslim countries, including the UAE. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

U.S., Britain Restrict Electronics On Flights From Mideast Countries

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French police officers secure the scene near the Paris offices of the International Monetary Fund on Thursday, following reports that a letter bomb had exploded at the premises. Christophe Archambault /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Flowers and well wishes are placed on a fence outside the hostel where British backpacker Mia Ayliffe-Chung, 21, was stabbed to death last year in a rural Australian community. A Frenchman was charged with her murder and that of another person, but while he allegedly said "Allahu akbar" during the attack, police found he showed no signs of radicalization. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters hold signs near the White House during a protest about President Trump's immigration policies on Wednesday. A proposed presidential action would freeze immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries for security reasons. But the list does not include any of the countries whose nationals have killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A man adjusts a victim's photograph displayed with floral tributes and Turkish flags outside the Reina nightclub following the attack in Istanbul earlier this month. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP