Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, is holding up an Obama trade nomination after U.S. trade authorities missed a deadline to ease secrecy protocols around TPP draft language. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka speaks against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact in a May 18 speech in Portland, Ore. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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As NAFTA Memories Linger, Unions Hold Fast Against New Trade Deal

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To study the draft Trans-Pacific Partnership language, senators have to go to the basement of the Capitol and enter a secured, soundproof room in this hallway and surrender their mobile devices. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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A Trade Deal Read In Secret By Only A Few (Or Maybe None)

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A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help "fill the void" being created by rising demand for meat in countries like Singapore through the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Allie Caulfield/Flickr hide caption

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Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a joint press conference at the White House with President Obama on Tuesday. Abe is urging U.S. lawmakers to approve a trans-Pacific trade deal. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approach the podiums for a joint press conference Tuesday at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Obama is hoping to finalize a new trade agreement with Japan and other Asian nations soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Confident In Asia Trade Pact, But Track Record For Deals Is Spotty

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A Malaysian flag sits on a table among other flags during a news conference at the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement talks in July 2012 in San Diego. Nearly two and a half years later, the deal remains incomplete. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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