Jessey Drewsen, 25, lives near the H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. She says she doesn't like the store, but that she goes there for cheap supplies like pens. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Jan/NPR

The H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. Ten years ago, none of the city's 600,000 residents lived within 1 mile of a Wal-Mart. Today, almost 13 percent do. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Jan/NPR

John Crawford III with his mother, Tressa Sherrod, in a photo released by the family. A special grand jury declined to indict officers in the fatal shooting of Crawford by police in an Ohio Wal-Mart in August. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products. Wal-Mart/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Wal-Mart/Flickr

Wal-Mart U.S. CEO Bill Simon speaks to shareholders at Bud Walton Arena in Fayetteville, Ark., during this week's shareholders' meeting. The company is coping with a bribery scandal, as well as demands from workers. Gareth Patterson/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gareth Patterson/AP

September 2012: Employees celebrate the opening of a Best Price Modern store in Hyderabad, India. Bharti Enterprises manages that and other such stores, which Wal-Mart has invested in. Noah Seelam /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Noah Seelam /AFP/Getty Images

Wal-Mart's Dr. John Agwunobi (left) said in a statement that the company won't be "building a national, integrated, low-cost primary care health care platform." Even so, the leaves plenty of room for the retailer to pursue an expansion of health care services at its stores. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Cliff Owen/AP