Jessey Drewsen, 25, lives near the H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. She says she doesn't like the store, but that she goes there for cheap supplies like pens. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

When Wal-Mart Comes To Town, What Does It Mean For Workers?

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The H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. Ten years ago, none of the city's 600,000 residents lived within 1 mile of a Wal-Mart. Today, almost 13 percent do. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

The Urban Neighborhood Wal-Mart: A Blessing Or A Curse?

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John Crawford III with his mother, Tressa Sherrod, in a photo released by the family. A special grand jury declined to indict officers in the fatal shooting of Crawford by police in an Ohio Wal-Mart in August. AP hide caption

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Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products. Wal-Mart/Flickr hide caption

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Wal-Mart/Flickr

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

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Wal-Mart U.S. CEO Bill Simon speaks to shareholders at Bud Walton Arena in Fayetteville, Ark., during this week's shareholders' meeting. The company is coping with a bribery scandal, as well as demands from workers. Gareth Patterson/AP hide caption

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Gareth Patterson/AP