Internet privacy Internet privacy

A now-deleted tweet from @ALT_USCIS was included in a complaint Twitter filed against the Department of Homeland Security. Twitter says DHS tried to unmask the user behind this account, which has "expressed dissent in a range of different ways," including this early tweet that "the author apparently believed cast doubt on the Administration's immigration policy." Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California hide caption

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Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California

Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit is moving to soften his predecessor's sweeping privacy rules for Internet service providers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
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Cryptoparties Teach Attendees How To Stay Anonymous Online

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Author Tim Wu says that much of the content on the Internet is created by businesses that are on a "quest for clicks." PeopleImages.com/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages.com/Getty Images

How Free Web Content Traps People In An Abyss Of Ads And Clickbait

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FBI Director James Comey said this week at Ohio's Kenyon College that "I saw something in the news, so I copied it. I put a piece of tape — I have obviously a laptop, personal laptop — I put a piece of tape over the camera. Because I saw somebody smarter than I am had a piece of tape over their camera." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says the right to be forgotten online is "a very bad solution to a real problem." Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

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Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

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Facebook says that starting soon, ad targeting will "include information from some of the websites and apps you use," making ads more relevant to users' interests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Legal experts say it's too soon to know the impact of a European court ruling that will require Google to remove some links upon request. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

European Ruling On Removing Google Links May Leave A Mess

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Annmarie Chiarini, whose ex-boyfriend posted private nude photos of her online, has emerged as a leading voice in the movement to pass legislation that criminalizes "revenge porn." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

A Google data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Even online privacy advocates acknowledge that keeping personal data out of the hands of third parties is virtually impossible today. Connie Zhou/AP hide caption

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Connie Zhou/AP

If There's Privacy In The Digital Age, It Has A New Definition

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