Lisa Olson, of Mesa, Ariz., uses marijuana to ease the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Stina Sieg/KJZZ

Marijuana's Mainstream Move Triggers Different Kinds Of Family Talks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492259757/492727654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

A strain of high-cannabidiol marijuana is used to create extracts used in experimental epilepsy treatments. GW Pharmaceuticals hide caption

toggle caption
GW Pharmaceuticals

Marijuana Extract May Help Some Children With Epilepsy, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458818829/459637433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton responds to a question from Roland Martin, host of TV One's News One Now, during a town hall meeting at Claflin University in Orangeburg, S.C., Richard Burkhart/AP Images for TV One hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Burkhart/AP Images for TV One

Ohio's proposal to legalize recreational and medical marijuana is being met with opposition from residents who generally support legalizing pot. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Fears Of Marijuana 'Monopoly' In Ohio Undercut Support For Legalization

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436958200/436966818" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cover art from Stoned. Current hide caption

toggle caption
Current

When Weed Is The Cure: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/422876973/422933132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marijuana at a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

Using chemicals to control bugs or mold is common among commercial cannabis growers. But with no federal oversight, experts are concerned growers may be using dangerous pesticides. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

Concern Grows Over Unregulated Pesticide Use Among Marijuana Growers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413429435/415138096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A marijuana bud displayed in Denver. Don't legalize pot, the pediatricians say, but don't lock teenagers up for using it, either. Seth McConnell/The Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Seth McConnell/The Denver Post/Getty Images

Workplace drug testing for marijuana may need updating in light of changing laws, a case before the Colorado Supreme Court suggests. Kai-Huei Yau/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kai-Huei Yau/MCT/Landov

Colorado Case Puts Workplace Drug Policies To The Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/339822911/339878625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Calkin, the president of the Cannabis Career Institute, spoke at an exhibition called Hempcon held in San Bernardino, Calif., last year Courtesy of Robert Calkin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Robert Calkin/AP

One of three marijuana plants growing in the backyard of a 65-year-old retiree from Pompano Beach, Fla. He grows and smokes his own "happy grass" to alleviate pain. Carline Jean/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Carline Jean/MCT/Landov

Entrepreneurs Buzzing Over Medical Marijuana In Florida

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/322580314/322597948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marijuana grown for medical purposes is shown inside a greenhouse at a farm in Potter Valley, Calif. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Rep. Andy Harris: Like chewing on mold

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/317427925/317429131" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Vaporizer pens look like the e-cigarettes that dispense nicotine. But these devices are optimized for a potent marijuana resin with high concentrations of THC. Courtesy of Grenco Science hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Grenco Science

Pot Smoke And Mirrors: Vaporizer Pens Hide Marijuana Use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/302992602/313844294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

C. Nash smokes after possession of marijuana became legal in Washington state on Dec. 6, 2012. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

Evidence On Marijuana's Health Effects Is Hazy At Best

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/283545932/285119968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript