Many federal inmates have access to email but defense attorneys say they don't trust it, because prosecutors have used those emails as evidence in court. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum on health care at Moulton Elementary School in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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New federal rules could expand the number of employees eligible for overtime. That may lead more companies to curtail the use of work email after hours. Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her mobile phone in March 2012 after her address to the Security Council at United Nations headquarters. While she's asked the State Department to quickly release her emails from her tenure as secretary, the process likely will take months — dragging out media coverage and critical questions. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan takes questions after addressing the Council on Foreign Relations on March 11. The CIA has proposed deleting the email of almost all employees after they leave the agency. But some critics are saying a larger portion of the email should be preserved. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer delivers the keynote address at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas earlier this month. Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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