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This is what the subject line may look like in the email, for people using Microsoft Outlook. The telltale sign something's amiss: that email address with that long line of H's. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Then-Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana speaks at a press conference in 2015. Under Indiana law, public officials are allowed to use personal email accounts; the practice can help them avoid using official accounts to conduct political business. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The new law was prompted by concerns over the intrusion of work into private lives. Carlina Teteris/Getty Images hide caption

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Carlina Teteris/Getty Images

For French Law On Right To 'Disconnect,' Much Support — And A Few Doubts

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Ray Tomlinson celebrates after receiving the 2009 Prince of Asturias Award Laureate for the Technical and Scientific Research from Spain's Prince Felipe. Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images

Get ready for your email inbox to be inundated this election season. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

'Bill Wants To Meet You': Why Political Fundraising Emails Work

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Many federal inmates have access to email but defense attorneys say they don't trust it, because prosecutors have used those emails as evidence in court. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When Prisoners Email Their Lawyers, It's Often Not Confidential

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum on health care at Moulton Elementary School in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

To: MelbourneElm22; Subject: My Dog Peed On You Today; Body: (◕︵◕)

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New federal rules could expand the number of employees eligible for overtime. That may lead more companies to curtail the use of work email after hours. Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Amid New Overtime Rules, More Employers Might Set Email Curfew

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her mobile phone in March 2012 after her address to the Security Council at United Nations headquarters. While she's asked the State Department to quickly release her emails from her tenure as secretary, the process likely will take months — dragging out media coverage and critical questions. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Clinton, White House Play Delicate Dance As Emails Await Release

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Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan takes questions after addressing the Council on Foreign Relations on March 11. The CIA has proposed deleting the email of almost all employees after they leave the agency. But some critics are saying a larger portion of the email should be preserved. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The CIA Wants To Delete Old Email; Critics Say 'Not So Fast'

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