One rationale for extending Medicaid coverage to more people is to help them get to a doctor or clinic before a minor illness becomes a medical emergency. iStockphoto hide caption

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Among heroin addicts who are able to quit, 40 to 60 percent relapse within the first year — many within the first weeks of release from a treatment program. Diane Diederich/iStockphoto hide caption

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Arkansas, Kentucky, Delaware and Colorado have all seen significant increases since 2013 in the percentage of residents who have health insurance. Vectoraart/iStockphoto hide caption

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Carmen Smith, 44, shows son Roland, 6, her new perfume. The Cleveland resident says getting on Medicaid has made it much easier to manage her diabetes. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Doctors say they need to accept patients with a variety of types of insurance in order for them to stay in businesses. iStockphoto hide caption

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Residents fear that the economy of Belhaven, N.C., will collapse because its hospital closed. "How many people go retire somewhere where it doesn't even have a hospital?" asks the mayor. Hyun Namkoong hide caption

itoggle caption Hyun Namkoong

Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the New York City borough of the Bronx. Natalie Fertig/WNYC hide caption

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Juanita Alvarado (right), a community health worker at the Transitions Clinic in San Francisco, helps a patient. courtesy of Transitions Clinic hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of Transitions Clinic

Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says having Medicaid pay for some students' coverage through the school health plan will give those students better options. Alex/Flickr hide caption

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A check of Medicare's new database of payments to physicians confirms that at least $6 million in 2012 went to doctors who had been indicted or otherwise sanctioned. iStockphoto hide caption

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