Medicaid Medicaid

Hygienist Beth Rowan cleans the teeth of Lindsay Klecker, 31, who has cerebral palsy and a seizure disorder. Rowan works at the Marshfield Clinic in Chippewa Falls, Wis. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Getting Dental Care Can Be A Challenge For People With Disabilities

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Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Burns/Getty Images

Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

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State lawmakers in West Virginia say their budget choices are only getting tougher. About a third of state residents are on Medicaid. OZinOH/Flickr hide caption

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OZinOH/Flickr

West Virginia Grapples With High Drug Costs

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A number of states recently have dedicated more money to educating women and health care providers about the 99 percent effectiveness of long-acting, reversible forms of contraception, like the intrauterine device, or IUD — shown here. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

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Michael Tomsic/WFAE

Long-Term, Reversible Contraception Gains Traction With Young Women

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Construction of Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro, N.C., was partially funded by the Hill-Burton Act. The hospital, seen circa 1973, was at the center of a court case, Simkins v. Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, that brought an end to racially segregated health care. Cone Health Medical Library hide caption

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Cone Health Medical Library

Eliminating disparities in cancer care requires more than just expanding Medicaid coverage, say cancer epidemiologists who found that patients with private insurance seemed to have a survival advantage. Thomas Barwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

When used in conjunction with counseling, Suboxone strips placed under the tongue can help ease opioid cravings and other withdrawal symptoms in people trying to quit a heroin or painkiller habit, doctors say. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Insurance Rules Can Hamper Recovery From Opioid Addiction

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Josephine Rudolph, 99, says she couldn't afford to live at the Joyce Eisenberg Keefer Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Reseda, Calif., without Medi-Cal assistance. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence took questions from the media as he and his wife, Karen, left their New York hotel to meet with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on July 15. Pence has drawn criticism from the left and the right for various health care stances. Andres Kudacki/AP hide caption

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Andres Kudacki/AP

A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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Toddlers need consistent care from a pediatrician to make sure, among other things, that they are hitting developmental milestones and their vaccinations are up-to-date. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

Her income as a New Orleans singer fluctuates with the tourist season, says Lisa Lynn Kotnik, and that's made health insurance too expensive in the past. Now that she has a Medicaid card, getting the health care and medicine she needs should be easier. Courtesy of Skip Bolen hide caption

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Courtesy of Skip Bolen

Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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Glenn Baker, 44, stands in his South Side apartment that is paid for by a program of the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. Miles Bryan/WBEZ hide caption

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Miles Bryan/WBEZ

A Hospital Offers Frequent ER Patients An Out — Free Housing

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The Text4Baby app sends free, periodic text messages in Spanish or English to pregnant women and new moms about prenatal care, labor and delivery, breastfeeding, developmental milestones and immunizations. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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