Political Fight Jeopardizes Medicaid In Mississippi
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Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, points during an intense conversation with President Obama after he arrived at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport in Mesa, Ariz. She has since made light of the incident in trying to rally support for a Medicaid expansion in the state. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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In Arizona, An Unlikely Ally For Medicaid Expansion
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Protesters march on the Texas Capitol in Austin on March 5, demanding that lawmakers expand Medicaid to include an additional 1.5 million poor people. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Texas Medicaid Debate Complicated By Politics And Poverty
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Second Thoughts On Medicaid From Oregon's Unique Experiment
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Outside the office of Utah Gov. Herbert Friday, Betsy Ogden lays paper chains on a pile symbolizing uninsured state residents who would be covered by a Medicaid expansion. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad speaks during a panel discussion at the National Governors Association 2013 Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Governors' D.C. Summit Dominated By Medicaid And The Sequester
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Florida Gov. Rick Scott, long a foe of the administration's health overhaul, reversed course and agree to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid in the state. J Pat Carter/AP hide caption

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Health plans are required to pay for contraceptives, but the clinics that are common sources of family planning services aren't used to dealing with insurers. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, favors a federally subsidized expansion of Medicaid in his state. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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A protester at a fiscal cliff rally on Monday in Doral, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe speaks about expanding Medicaid during a speech to the Arkansas State Chamber of Commerce in Little Rock, Ark., on Nov. 14. The federal government hasn't set a deadline for states to decide on their Medicaid expansion plans. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Feds Say 'No' To Partial Medicaid Expansion
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Two new studies and a proposed class-action lawsuit settlement all have the potential to change dollar signs as lawmakers address the impending fiscal cliff. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Health Care Cuts Are Coming: Here's Where Liberals Say You Can Slice
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A medical assistant checks a patient's blood pressure at a community health center in Aurora, Colo. Metro Community Provider Network has received some 6,000 more Medicaid eligible patients since the health overhaul law was passed in 2010. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Democrats And Republicans Differ On Medicaid Fix
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