Among heroin addicts who are able to quit, 40 to 60 percent relapse within the first year — many within the first weeks of release from a treatment program. Diane Diederich/iStockphoto hide caption

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Recovery Coach Helps An Addict Resist Heroin's Lure

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Arkansas, Kentucky, Delaware and Colorado have all seen significant increases since 2013 in the percentage of residents who have health insurance. Vectoraart/iStockphoto hide caption

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Numbers Of Americans With Health Plans Way Up, But States Vary

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Carmen Smith, 44, shows son Roland, 6, her new perfume. The Cleveland resident says getting on Medicaid has made it much easier to manage her diabetes. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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A Hospital Reboots Medicaid To Give Better Care For Less Money

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Doctors say they need to accept patients with a variety of types of insurance in order for them to stay in businesses. iStockphoto hide caption

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Two Doctors Weigh Whether To Accept Obamacare Plans

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Residents fear that the economy of Belhaven, N.C., will collapse because its hospital closed. "How many people go retire somewhere where it doesn't even have a hospital?" asks the mayor. Hyun Namkoong hide caption

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Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the New York City borough of the Bronx. Natalie Fertig/WNYC hide caption

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New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

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Juanita Alvarado (right), a community health worker at the Transitions Clinic in San Francisco, helps a patient. courtesy of Transitions Clinic hide caption

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Health Care Can Be Key To A Better Life For Former Inmates

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Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says having Medicaid pay for some students' coverage through the school health plan will give those students better options. Alex/Flickr hide caption

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A check of Medicare's new database of payments to physicians confirms that at least $6 million in 2012 went to doctors who had been indicted or otherwise sanctioned. iStockphoto hide caption

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Cheryl Stumph goes over paperwork with a medical worker. She finally has health insurance to take care of her family's medical needs. Kristian Foden-Vencil for NPR hide caption

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Wave Of Newly Insured Patients Strains Oregon Health Plan

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