Medicaid Medicaid

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

A Tale Of 2 States: How California And Texas May Fare Under GOP Health Plan

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Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. (right), and Rick Santorum, former senator from Pennsylvania, listen during a health reform news conference on Capitol Hill last week. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Children's Health Insurance Program relies on money from state and federal governments to help subsidize the cost of medical care for some kids not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images

Needles at the Alaska AIDS Assistance Association syringe exchange in Anchorage. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Syringe Exchange Program Aims To Slow Hepatitis C Infections In Alaska

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Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, pictured here during an interview last month, ended the state's Medicaid contract with Planned Parenthood two years ago. He praised the circuit court's decision. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

Deona Scott and her son Phoenix at her graduation from Charleston Southern University in South Carolina in 2015. Scott now works full time for Nurse-Family Partnership, a program she credits with helping to prepare her to be a good mother. Courtesy of Deona Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Deona Scott

Bill Moyers On Working With LBJ To Pass Medicare 52 Years Ago

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Amanda Chaffin comforts son Kayden, 4, who has a genetic condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, and depends on a ventilator to breathe. Chaffin is worried about the high costs of Kayden's care. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Tara Lang was pregnant with her daughter when her fiance was killed in a motorcycle crash. A pregnancy center in Metairie, La., helped her sign up for Medicaid coverage. Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO hide caption

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Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO

How Crisis Pregnancy Center Clients Rely On Medicaid

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The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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