Joshua Vallum is sworn in before pleading guilty to state murder charges at George County Circuit Court in Lucedale, Miss., last July. On Monday, he was sentenced to 49 years in prison for a federal hate crime — the first such case brought for a crime specifically targeting a victim because of their gender identity. Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS via Getty Images

1st Man Prosecuted For Federal Hate Crime Targeting Transgender Victim Gets 49 Years

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Members of the South Asian community and others attend a peace vigil for Srinivas Kuchibhotla, the 32-year-old Indian engineer killed at a bar Olathe, Kansas, in Bellevue, Washington on March 5, 2017. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indian Americans Reckon With Reality Of Hate Crimes

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A screenshot from a video about the Sikh community that is part of a large awareness campaign. The project was funded entirely by grass-roots donations. The campaign's ads will air nationally. We Are Sikhs/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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We Are Sikhs/Screenshot by NPR

Martin Luther King, Jr. listening to a transistor radio in the front line of the third march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to campaign for proper registration of black voters, March 23, 1965. Ralph Abernathy (second from left), Ralph Bunche (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (far right) march with him. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

Jose "Joe" Torres (left) weeps in his seat during his sentencing at the Douglas County Courthouse in Douglasville, Ga., on Monday. Superior Court Judge William McClain sentenced Torres and Kayla Norton to lengthy prison terms Monday for their role in the disruption of a black child's birthday party through the use of Confederate battle flags, racial slurs and armed threats. Henry P. Taylor/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP hide caption

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Henry P. Taylor/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP

Assistant Attorney General Kimberly Strovink, of Massachusetts Attorney General Healey's Civil Rights Division, answers calls coming into the state's hate hotline. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Massachusetts Hotline Tracks Post-Election Hate

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John Lu (left), Reynold Liang (center) and David Wu (right) during a news conference in Queens, N.Y., after being the victims of a hate crime in 2006. New York City council member David Weprin (second left) and John C. Liu look on. Adam Rountree/AP hide caption

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Adam Rountree/AP

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says law enforcement officials know that many hate crimes are not reported in communities across the country. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Advocacy Groups Push For Better Tracking Of Hate Crimes

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If you see a bias-based attack at a subway station, do you know how to intervene? Activists in New York City are preparing people with tips like engaging the victim and distracting the harasser. Canadian Pacific/Flickr hide caption

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Canadian Pacific/Flickr

In New York, Activists Prepare Bystanders To Take Action Against Harassment

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People protest the appointment of white nationalist alt-right media mogul, former Breitbart News head Steve Bannon, to be chief strategist of the White House by President-elect Donald Trump on Nov. 16, near City Hall in Los Angeles, Calif.MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images) David McNew/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP/Getty Images

Anti-Defamation League Official: Racist Incidents 'A Wake-Up Call'

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Adam Yauch Park was renamed for the late Beastie Boy back in 2013. This weekend, its young clientele are taking the playground back from vandals who spray-painted signs of hate on the playground. Daniel Zuchnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Zuchnik/Getty Images

Azra Baig won a second term on the school board in South Brunswick, N.J. But many of her reelection signs were defaced with anti-Muslim slurs. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Following Hate Crimes And Trump's Election, Muslims Remain Resilient

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People pay respects outside of Emanuel African Methodist Church in June 2015 after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people in Charleston, South Carolina. Paul Zoeller/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Zoeller/Pool/Getty Images

The United Kingdom Independence Party's "Breaking Point" EU referendum campaign poster was deemed so offensive and reminiscent of Nazi propaganda that even the official Leave campaign condemned it. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images