John Castello decided to stop playing football when he learned about the risks of brain injury. Dave Marmarelli/DGM Photography hide caption

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The Impact Of 'Concussion': High School Football Player Changes Course

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Tight end O.J. Howard of the Alabama Crimson Tide scores a 53-yard touchdown Monday in the third quarter against the Clemson Tigers during the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship Game in Glendale, Ariz. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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"Osceola" stands in front of a crowd at the FSU homecoming game. Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune hide caption

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Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

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Sister Lisa Maurer, nun and kicking coach for the College of St. Scholastica football team, watches during drills in October. Derek Montgomery for MPR News hide caption

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Meet The College Football Coach Who Really Knows Her Hail Marys

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Arkansas running back Jonathan Williams had just scored a touchdown against Missouri last season when he dropped the ball and raised his hands in a hands up, don't shoot" gesture. L.G. Patterson/AP hide caption

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A Deep-Rooted History Of Activism Stirs In College Football

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In this Sept. 15, 1930, photo, coach Knute Rockne puts his football proteges through the first football drill of the season at Cartier Field, South Bend, Ind. Rockne finished his career with an .860 winning percentage and delivered the famous "Win one for the Gipper" speech. AP hide caption

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Football, Notre Dame And Winning 'For The Gipper'

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Columbia University players watch hopefully as they take on Fordham University. Despite a good start, the game ended in a loss for the Lions. Amy Pearl/WNYC hide caption

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An Ivy, A New Coach And A Perfectly Terrible Football Record

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After five football players were arrested Thursday, Rutgers University suspended the group. Two other former players are also suspected of crimes that range from assault to robbery. Here, the school's board of governors is seen in a meeting this summer. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Northwestern football players are reflected in a helmet during drills at a practice. On Monday, the National Labor Relations Board dismissed a petition that players be allowed to form a union. Jeffrey Phelps/AP hide caption

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Supporters of former Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno have launched a campaign to reclaim his legacy, including an initiative to have his statute returned to the university grounds. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Supporters Work To Reclaim Legacy Of Penn State Coach Joe Paterno

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The Yale football team in an undated photo. Commentator Frank Deford finds it curious that a sport as brutal as football became popular among the academic elite. AP hide caption

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Crowning The 33rd-Best Football Team In America

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