Outside the court in Cairo where former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has been on trial, a man earlier today held a sign saying there was a noose waiting for Mubarak. Marco Longari /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson talks with Steve Inskeep

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Nov. 28: Women place their votes in a ballot box at a polling station in a girls school in Cairo. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Egyptian Elections: 62 Percent Turnout

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An Egyptian woman shows her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in the Manial neighborhood of Cairo earlier today (Nov. 28, 2011). Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (in red) shook hands with a child as she visited Cairo's Tahrir Square earlier today (March 16, 2011). Paul J. Richards /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Kelemen reporting from Cairo

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Egyptian antiquities graduates protested in front of the Supreme Council of Antiquities in Cairo today (Feb. 14, 2011). They were among many groups demanding jobs, higher pay or better working conditions. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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An Egyptian anti-goverment holds his national flag as he shouts slogans against President Hosni Mubarak at Cairo's Tahrir Square on February 10, 2011, on the 17th day of protests against Mubarak's regime. Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As an anti-government protester chanted today in Cairo, an Egyptian Army soldier watched from the roof of parliament. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Inskeep and Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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After addressing the crowd of protesters, Wael Ghonim spoke to reporters at Cairo's Tahrir square on Tuesday (Feb. 8, 2011.) Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro on Wael Ghonim

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Wael Ghonim greeted thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square earlier today (Feb. 8, 2011). John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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