People line up to buy groceries outside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on July 13. The State Department issued a travel warning for the country on July 7. Four other countries have been the subject of U.S. travel warnings since July 1. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Often Issues Travel Warnings, But Lately The Tables Are Turned

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Crowds gather to watch the Fourth of July fireworks show last year at Kailua Beach on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. Julie Thurston Photography via Getty Images hide caption

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Prime Minister David Cameron's cat, Larry, sits on the steps of No. 10 Downing St. in London on June 24, the day Brexit voting results were announced. If the Cameron family wants to take Larry along on holiday to France, a Brexit could complicate plans. It's possible that traveling to and from the EU with pets will grow more cumbersome. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Travelers go through the TSA PreCheck security point at Miami International Airport on June 2. The number of TSA PreCheck applicants has more than doubled owing to record security wait times. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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TSA PreCheck Applications Soar Amid Long Lines At Airports

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Would the threat of Zika lead you to rethink a scheduled trip to Ipanema beach or the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil? You'd need the right kind of travel insurance to cover the cost of a canceled trip. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Lines of travelers at Denver International Airport snake their way through security on Thursday. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Cities Consider Privatizing TSA To Speed Up Checkpoints, But Would It?

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Passengers walk through the terminal as they head to their flights at Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., on Dec. 23, 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Oil Plummets, Cheap Jet Fuel Means Better Travel Deals

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Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

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To Avoid Intestinal Distress While Traveling Overseas, Skip The Ceviche

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Report: Mergers Have Cut Airline Competition At Many Airports, Raising Fares

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Brooke Borel says bedbugs were essentially wiped out after World War II thanks to DDT. It's not totally clear why they came back in the past couple of decades. iStockphoto hide caption

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The Creepy, Crawly World Of Bedbugs And How They Have 'Infested' Homes

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Fuel prices have plummeted this year, but airfares have remained high. The International Air Transport Association estimates that the world's airlines will rake in nearly $20 billion in profits this year. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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The Year In Air Travel: Packed Planes And More Perks — For A Price

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