A vegan Thanksgiving feast, featuring Tofurky Shira Golding/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Shira Golding/Flickr

President Roosevelt celebrating Thanksgiving with polio patients at the Warm Springs Foundation for Infantile Paralysis Sufferers the Friday after the national holiday in 1938. Bettmann/Corbis/AP hide caption

toggle caption Bettmann/Corbis/AP

Families generally offer homogenous groupings when it comes to politics — but there's always that outlier brother-in-law or great-aunt. ClassicStock/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption ClassicStock/Corbis

All out of nutmeg? The same algorithms that predicts your friends on Facebook can also figure out ingredient substitutions for your pumpkin pie this Thanksgiving. Courtesy of Lada Adamic. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Lada Adamic.

Chef Jose Garces' quinoa soup. Jason Varney hide caption

toggle caption Jason Varney

A Dash Of Latin Flavor On The Thanksgiving Table

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165221485/165233685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Superstorm Sandy, the Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties in Neptune, N.J., is filled with water bottles, canned food and other goods. But these supplies are going out almost as fast as they come in. Amy Walters/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Amy Walters/NPR

Storm-Battered Food Banks Struggle To Help The Hungry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165046153/165057205" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

European settlers almost wiped out North America's native wild turkey. But conservation efforts have proved successful. There are now nearly 7 million birds found across 49 states. Larry Price, National Wild Turkey Federation/NWTF.org hide caption

toggle caption Larry Price, National Wild Turkey Federation/NWTF.org

Wild Turkeys Gobble Their Way To A Comeback

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164795556/164894052" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, on Nov. 20, 2011. Emma Jacobs/WRVO hide caption

toggle caption Emma Jacobs/WRVO

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142594442/142724362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Narragansett and Standard Bronze heritage breed turkeys browse at a farm in Westport, Mass. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

toggle caption Stephan Savoia/AP

Serve this for T-Day, and you'll be in sync with history. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

Oyster Ice Cream: A Thanksgiving Tradition Mark Twain Could Get Behind

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142669973/142702846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

To grandmother's house they go: A highway in San Diego last evening. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption Gregory Bull/AP

Jean Cochran on the NPR Newscast

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142699242/142699360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">