physics physics

The laces on the left are tied in a strong knot that lies horizontally. The laces on the right are tied in a knot that makes the bow lie vertically and which, according to new research, can come untied more easily. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Untangling The Mystery Of Why Shoelaces Come Untied

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A tiny radio receiver built from components the size of two atoms. It emits a signal as red light, which is then converted into an electrical current and can be broadcast as sound by a speaker or headphone. Eliza Grinnell/Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences hide caption

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Eliza Grinnell/Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

This Christmas Song Brought To You By The World's Tiniest Radio Receiver

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Winners of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics are displayed on a screen during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Tuesday. David J. Thouless, F. Duncan M. Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz were awarded the 2016 Nobel Physics Prize "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter." Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

The star-forming area Messier 17, also known as the Omega Nebula or the Swan Nebula, is a vast region of gas, dust and hot young stars that lies in the heart of the Milky Way in the constellation of Sagittarius. ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM hide caption

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ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM

Jamaica's Usain Bolt crosses the finish line to win the gold in the men's 200-meter final during the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. Anja Niedringhaus/AP hide caption

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Anja Niedringhaus/AP

Michigan Wolverines fans do the wave in support of their team as it faces the Brigham Young Cougars at Michigan Stadium on Sept. 26, 2015, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Doug Pensinger/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

The Physics And Psychology Of 'The Wave' At Sporting Events

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Physicist Stephon Alexander shares his love of science with his students at Brown University, and his love of jazz with musicians around Providence. Ari Daniel for NPR hide caption

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Ari Daniel for NPR

Scientist Stephon Alexander: 'Infinite Possibilities' Unite Jazz And Physics

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Every bit of steel in the car you drive has been measured as to its capability to withstand certain forces — pushing and pulling. Machines like this do the measuring. Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST PML hide caption

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Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST PML

How Do You Lift A Million Pounds Of Stainless Steel? Very Carefully

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