T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965), winner of the 1948 Nobel Prize in Literature Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Álvaro Marín
Fun With Physics: How To Make Tiny Medicine Nanoballs
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NIST physicist and Nobel Prize-winner David Wineland adjusts an ultraviolet laser beam used to manipulate ions in a high-vacuum apparatus containing an "ion trap." These devices have been used to demonstrate the basic operations required for a quantum computer. Copyright Geoffrey Wheeler/National Institute of Standards and Technology hide caption

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Physics And Cities: View From The Street
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It was science, and a sneeze, that helped Dmitri Krioukov persuade a judge that he had obeyed the sign. Mark Memmott/NPR hide caption

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Math + Physics + Fancy Language + Sneeze = Beating Traffic Ticket
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This visualization shows the electron density in a quantum dot, an artificial atom. Wei Qiao, David Ebert, Marek Korkusinski, Gerhard Klimeck/NCN, Purdue University hide caption

toggle caption Wei Qiao, David Ebert, Marek Korkusinski, Gerhard Klimeck/NCN, Purdue University