A boot-drying rack sits empty at the Ministry of Defense Ebola Treatment Unit in Monrovia. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Moses Lasana recovered from Ebola, but he faces a range of medical issues and waves of pain. "The pain just come from one part of the body to another," he says. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Caroline Williams is a community organizer in New Kru Town, a suburb of Monrovia. Here's how she got her message through to Liberians about preventing Ebola: "We talk to them, talk to them, talk to them. At last they started listening to us. All the methods that we been giving them, by God's will, they accepted." Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

A nurse holds a young girl who was vaccinated at the kickoff of a national measles prevention campaign in Liberia. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lucy Barh, head of the Liberian Midwives Association, says of the impending end of the Ebola outbreak: "It is a joy, it is a joy. And I am so grateful to God. The Lord almighty has love for this nation. That is why we have come to this point." Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Heffernan photographs health care worker Martha Lyne Freeman. Courtesy of Marc Campos/Occidental College hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Marc Campos/Occidental College

Chuckie Taylor in Liberia at an unknown date and location. Courtesy of Johnny Dwyer and Lynn Henderson hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Johnny Dwyer and Lynn Henderson

Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Tarkpor Mambia in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. He says he "literally froze" during his first American winter in 2013, but is getting used to the cold weather. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ryan Kellman/NPR

Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, photographed in Washington, D.C., on February 26. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose for a picture outside their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh's house. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mamuedeh Kanneh was married to Laiye Barwor, the man who brought Ebola to Barkedu, Liberia. He died of the virus. She now cares for her children as well as children who lost their parents to the disease. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Dr. Kwan Kew Lai volunteered for six weeks at an Ebola treatment center run by International Medical Corps in Bong, Liberia. Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai

Boys run from blowing dust as a U.S. Marine vehicle takes off from an Ebola treatment center under construction in Liberia in October. In the end, the centers weren't always needed, but the military's ability to ferry supplies was critical in fighting the outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Theses 32 health workers are among the 360-plus who sacrificed their lives in the fight against Ebola. Their names are listed below. The photos are displayed at the Liberian Midwives Association in Monrovia. NPR Composite hide caption

itoggle caption NPR Composite

Dr. John Fankhauser, one of the many missionaries battling Ebola, is sprayed with disinfectant at ELWA hospital in Liberia. Courtesy of Bethany Fankhauser hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Bethany Fankhauser