Dr. Senga Omeonga pictured outside St. Joseph's Catholic Hospital in Monrovia. Omeonga moved to Liberia from DRC in 2011. He contracted Ebola but survived it. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Health workers rest outside a quarantine zone at a Red Cross facility in the town of Koidu, Kono district in Eastern Sierra Leone on Friday. The World Health Organization says the number of Ebola deaths in the current outbreak has exceeded 7,000. Baz Ratner/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ebola survivor Klubo Mulbah (center), a physician assistant who was infected by a patient, celebrates among friends and family on Sept. 24 in Monrovia, Liberia. She was among 15 Liberian patients who recovered from Ebola and were released from the ELWA 2 ebola treatment center. Michel du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Daily Talk uses chalk, photos and Liberian slang to spread the latest news. Editor Alfred Sirleaf set up the blackboard on Monrovia's main thoroughfare. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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The bright yellow steel truss bridge over St. John's River is the official border crossing between Liberia and Guinea. The Liberian-Guinean border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Community workers build an Ebola clinic on Nov. 8 in Lokomasama, near Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The community decided to organize and fight the disease — building a holding center for suspected cases, enforcing a travel ban. It created a $100 fine for a handshake and a $200 fine plus six months in jail for an illegal burial. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the community in New Georgia Signboard greet President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf Monday for the launch of the Ebola Must Go! campaign. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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