Will the lights be on late at the White House for the next few nights, or will talks about the "fiscal cliff" be less than dramatic? Larry Downing /Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Larry Downing /Reuters /Landov

President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, at the White House last month. Toby Jorrin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Jorrin/AFP/Getty Images

On 'Morning Edition': Scott Horsley and David Greene

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167520314/167518036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) leaves after his weekly news briefing at the U.S. Capitol Thursday. Boehner said negotiations with President Barack Obama to are stalled until the White House offers more federal budget spending cuts. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Obama, with House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) behind him, delivering his State of the Union address last January. Saul Loeb/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/Getty Images

On 'Fiscal Cliff,' Majority Of Public Sides With Democrats, Pew Poll Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167159547/167197972" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Erskine Bowles, a Democrat (at left), and former Sen. Alan Simpson, a Republican, are co-chairmen of the commission. They spoke with reporters Tuesday in Washington. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

'The Solutions Are Painful'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131724320/131724344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">