The World Resources Institute says you don't have to bid burgers bye-bye in order to reduce the environmental footprint of what you eat. For Americans, cutting back on beef (but not eliminating it altogether) could go a long way, it says. iStockphoto hide caption

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Chew On This: Slicing Meat Helped Shape Modern Humans

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Matthew Secich's wife, Crystal, behind the sausage counter at the deli they opened in Unity, Maine. Jennifer Mitchell/MPBN hide caption

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Chef Trades Toque For Amish Beard, Opens Off-The-Grid Deli In Maine

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The Cargill beef processing plant in Fort Morgan, Colo., advertises openings in early January. Some 150 Muslim workers were fired in late 2015 after a dispute over prayer breaks at the plant. Luke Runyon/KUNC and Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Dispute Over Prayer Breaks Divides Muslim Meatpacking Workers

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Eat This, Not That: The U.S. government's latest Dietary Guidelines call on Americans to eat more vegetables and fruits, more seafood and whole grains, and to cool it on foods high in sugar, refined grains, sodium and saturated fats. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass

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Cattle carcasses hang on hooks inside a cooler at the JBS beef processing plant in Greeley, Colo. JBS employs some 3,000 workers at this plant. The company is looking into ways to automate the art of butchery. Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Spanish hams hang from the ceiling at Museo del Jamón, a ham bar in downtown Madrid. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Spaniards Snap Up Holiday Hams, Even After Cancer Warning

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The famed architectural firm Burnham and Root designed the iconic entranceway to the Union Stock Yard in 1879. It quickly became the symbol of the market and the meat industry in Chicago. Courtesy of Dominic A. Pacyga/University of Chicago Press hide caption

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The College Of William And Mary anthropology professor Barbara J. King presents her "last" lecture, on emotions in the animal world, as she prepares to retire from academic life. Courtesy of Skip Rowland hide caption

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Matt LeRoux of the Cornell Cooperative Extension opens one of the rentable bins at the new meat locker in Corning, N.Y. Solvejg Wastvedt for NPR hide caption

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A Carnivore's Solution To Space Constraints: The Meat Locker

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Beef carcasses hang in the sales cooler at the JBS beef plant in Greeley, Colo. Stephanie Paige Ogburn/KUNC hide caption

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Inside The World's Largest Food Company You've Probably Never Heard Of

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The bistro imagines the day when will be possible to culture "meat thread" made from long strands of muscle tissue. On a "special knitting machine," meat is thread into a steak. Submarine Channel/Next Nature Network/Bistro In Vitro hide caption

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Bottom round roast is one cut of beef that fits the government's definition of "lean." Still, the definition is confusing to consumers, nutrition scientists argue. Paul Polis/Corbis hide caption

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Gayland Regier carries buckets of feed to his cattle in southeast Nebraska. Imported cattle make up a small portion of the American beef supply, but many American farmers and ranchers are concerned that foreign-sourced meat could distort their markets. courtesy of Grant Gerlock/NET News/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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A government-appointed panel concluded in a recent report that Americans should eat less red meat and processed meat. A more plant-focused diet is better for health and the environment, it found. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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A daily cup of joe (or two) may help protect against Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. And an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease in healthy people, according to a panel of nutrition experts. Premshee Pillai/Flickr hide caption

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Nutrition Panel: Egg With Coffee Is A-OK, But Skip The Side Of Bacon

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