Employees load a body into a van after heavily-armed gunmen opened fire in the Ivory Coast resort town of Grand-Bassam, leaving bodies strewn on the beach, killing more than a dozen people. The assailants, who were "heavily armed and wearing balaclavas, fired at guests at the L'Etoile du Sud, a large hotel which was full of expats in the current heatwave," a witness told AFP. Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

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Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

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Former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo is surrounded by guards at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands. PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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The president of the Ivorian Constitutional Council, Paul Yao Ndre speaks at the council's headquarters on May 5, 2011 in Abidjan. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Ivory Coast

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Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara addresses his nation from Abidjan after rival Laurent Gbagbo was arrested on April 11, 2011. Aristide Bodegla/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Ivory Coast

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Renee Montagne talks with Arthur Goldhammer

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A screengrab from a video released on April 7, 2011 by the French military officials shows Japanese Ambassador Okamura Yoshifumi being evacuated from his home in Abidjan. SIRPA TERRE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ban Ki-Moon laments Laurent Gbagbo's poor leadership

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Laurent Gbagbo loyalists captured by supporters of rival president Alassane Ouattara are held at Ouattara's headquarters in Abijan on April 5, 2011. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gbagbo called "The Baker" - he rolls people up in flour

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Fighters loyal to Alassane Ouattara prepare ammunition in Abidjan on April 3, 2011. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Ivory Coast fighting

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