Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Park Geun-hye walk to their seats for the start of a trilateral meeting with the U.S. in 2014. Japan and Korea's leaders have yet to meet one-on-one. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Songdo, outside Seoul, was envisioned as a futuristic international business hub, drawing residents from all over the world. Instead, this young city has become populated mostly by Koreans. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship. Issei Kato/AP hide caption

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A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula. Dave Yoder/National Geographic hide caption

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South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint news conference following meetings at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Seoul. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Asian music hitmaker Jae Chong, at work in a studio in Seoul. His work is all over Asian charts, but his passport is American. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Crews aboard ships involved in the recovery effort at the site where a South Korean ferry sank continued to work as night fell Thursday. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yellow ribbons hang from a fence outside Danwon High School in Ansan, South Korea, as some students return Thursday for the first time since a ferry disaster claimed the lives of scores of their classmates. Yang Ji-woong /EPA/Landov hide caption

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As the sun set Wednesday in Jindo, South Korea, a woman kept watch on the waters where the Sewol ferry sank. It's feared the death toll will reach 300. Nicolas Asfouri /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cranes, ships and other rescue equipment are on the scene off the southern coast of South Korea, where a ferry capsized Wednesday. About 270 people, most of them high school students, remain missing. Kim Hong-Ji /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Holding out hope, fearing the worst: A man looks out from the shore in Jindo, South Korea, toward where a passenger ferry sank Wednesday and nearly 300 people are still missing. Kim Kyung-Hoon /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Rescuers head toward the ferry Sewol off the southern coast of South Korea on Wednesday. It sank while on a trip to a resort island. Several hundred people, most of them high school students and teachers, are missing. Yonhap News/EPA/Landov hide caption

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In this handout image provided by the South Korean Unification Ministry, Kim Kyou-Hyun (right) the head of South Korea's high-level delegation, shakes hands with his North Korean counterpart Won Tong-Yon before their meeting Wednesday in Panmunjom, South Korea. /Getty Images hide caption

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