Iran's President Hassan Rouhani visited the Bushehr nuclear power plant in January. Iran has always insisted that its nuclear program is for civilian purposes. But a new report by the International Atomic Energy Agency says that Iran had a nuclear weapons program until 2003. Mohammad Berno/Iranian Presidency Office via AP hide caption

toggle caption Mohammad Berno/Iranian Presidency Office via AP

Watchdog Pulls Back Curtain On Iran's Nuclear Weapons Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458206341/458206348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Inside a nondescript building at Los Alamos National Laboratory known as TA-66, nuclear weapons inspectors are carefully trained in the detection of plutonium. Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory

How Do You Find Plutonium? Go To Nuclear Inspector School

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/449031762/449862134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts a uranium enrichment connection at Iran's Natanz facility, 200 miles south of Tehran, in 2014. The U.S. Congress is expected to address the Iranian nuclear deal this month. One unresolved issue: How much work might Iran have done previously on weaponizing its program? Kazem Ghane/AP hide caption

toggle caption Kazem Ghane/AP

An Unanswered Question About Iran's Nuclear Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436593083/436673760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama has reason to smile. He's now just three votes shy of being able to sustain a veto of a resolution of congressional disapproval of his Iran nuclear deal — that is, of being able to advance the deal over Republican objections. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama says Iran's "nuclear breakout" time will be extended from the current two or three months to at least a year under the nuclear agreement. But he acknowledges that some restrictions will fall away after 15 years and the breakout time would again shrink. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Morgan Walker/NPR

Obama: Iran Will Face Longer 'Breakout Time,' Though Not Indefinitely

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/431652556/431673092" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.N. Security Council endorsed the historic Iran nuclear deal on Monday. Now, world leaders — notably in the U.S. and Iran — must garner enough support for the agreement at home. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption Seth Wenig/AP

Parrying Doubts In Two Capitals, Leaders Sell The Iran Nuclear Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/424702931/424722525" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a sermon during morning prayers for the Eid al-Fitr holiday, marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. He signaled his approval of the nuclear agreement with Western powers but reiterated that Tehran's policy toward the "arrogant" United States would not change. Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Reuters/Landov

An International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts a uranium enrichment connection at Iran's Natanz facility, 200 miles south of Tehran, in 2014. This week's nuclear deal gives the IAEA up to 150 inspectors to monitor Iran for compliance. Kazem Ghane/AP hide caption

toggle caption Kazem Ghane/AP

Nuke Inspectors Gear Up For Iran, But Americans Unlikely To Be Included

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423876081/424079312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man walks past a poster advertising travel to Tehran, Iran, in Los Angeles on July 14. A nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers lifts some sanctions against Iran, but most U.S. sanctions will remain in place. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

What Lifting Iran's Sanctions Means For U.S. Businesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423643361/423740624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shoppers make their way in a Tehran bazaar. Once international sanctions are lifted, $100 billion from Iranian oil sales will be released from escrow accounts. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption Vahid Salemi/AP

Lifting Sanctions Will Release $100 Billion To Iran. Then What?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423562391/423605254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Iranian family walks past anti-U.S. graffiti on the wall of the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on Tuesday. President Hassan Rouhani told Iranians that "all our objectives" have been met by a nuclear deal agreed upon Tuesday after talks with six world powers, including the U.S. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images