President Obama delivers remarks in the Rose Garden after the U.S. Supreme Court's 6-3 ruling to uphold the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act cheer outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., after a majority on the court ruled that Obamacare tax credits can continue to go to residents of any state. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The Supreme Court is considering the case of King v. Burwell, which could determine the fate of health care subsidies for millions of people. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Wong/Getty Images

"It would be disingenuous of me not to suggest that the link between the ... recommendations and insurance coverage hasn't put an additional focus on our work," says Dr. Michael LeFevre. Courtesy of Michael LeFevre hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Michael LeFevre
Elly Walton/Ikon Images/Corbis

"Nearly 1 in 3 uninsured Americans have already been covered — more than 16 million people -– driving our uninsured rate to its lowest level ever," President Obama told a cheering crowd at the Catholic Health Association's annual conference Tuesday. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov

An analysis shows the monthly premiums for many people with Obamacare policies will not much change in 2016. But the high increases of some policies are drawing fire. Rob Colvin/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Rob Colvin/ImageZoo/Corbis

Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell talks before a Capitol Hill hearing Wednesday with Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., as Rep. Pat Meehan, R-Pa., looks on. Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Getty Images

Renee Mitchell says even though she has health insurance she'll have trouble paying for the eye surgery she needs to save her vision. Jim Burress/WABE hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Burress/WABE

Health plans begun under the Affordable Care Act are required to cover FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost to members. Older plans are exempt from that rule. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Michael Carvin (right), lead attorney for the petitioners speaking before the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The justices heard arguments in King v. Burwell. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dana Verkouteren/AP

Carol and John Iovine say the health coach their insurer assigned John after he had a torrent of grave health problems in 2014 has helped them get the medical care he still needs. And it's helped keep him out of the hospital. Todd Bookman/WHYY hide caption

itoggle caption Todd Bookman/WHYY

People protesting against the Affordable Care Act rallied outside the Supreme Court in March, before arguments in the second major challenge to the law. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov

If you're at high risk of hepatitis B infection, your insurance company should pay for testing for the virus without passing any of the cost on to you. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine/Science Source

An Access Health CT location in New Britain, Conn. Courtesy of Access Health CT hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Access Health CT