At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with a student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means "leaf" and solsi translates to "fire." Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School

Safeena Husain says: "I educate girls." Her efforts have brought 80,000 Indian girls into school; last week she received a Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship (above). Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond

At her home in the U.K., Malala Yousafzai reads her letter to the missing Nigerian schoolgirls. Courtesy of Malala Fund hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Malala Fund

New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School. Jonathan Johnson hide caption

itoggle caption Jonathan Johnson

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama unveiled the Let Girls Learn program at the East Room of the White House on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Jimmy Kamara, 9, is one of the students in Sierra Leone who use radios to continue their education while schools remain closed owing to Ebola. Tolu Bade/Courtesy of UNICEF hide caption

itoggle caption Tolu Bade/Courtesy of UNICEF

According to a new study from African-American Policy Forum, black girls and teens are disproportionately impacted by zero-tolerance policies in schools. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Terry Vine/Getty Images

Emily Neblett, a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., demonstrates circuit pieces from the mobile maker space that are connected by magnets. Noah Nelson/Youth Radio hide caption

itoggle caption Noah Nelson/Youth Radio

Six-year old Hadja Sow (left) and a classmate on their first day back at school after a prolonged break because of Ebola. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

A new U.S. citizen holds an American flag during a naturalization ceremony in July. An Arizona law will require graduating high school seniors to pass the same civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Lennihan/AP

When he was 11 years old, James Arinaitwe boarded a bus with a crazy plan: Sneak into the president's house and beg for a high school scholarship. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Claire Eggers/NPR

Daniel Majook Gai from South Sudan goes in and out of his war-torn country to help children there go to school. Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan