Pearl Harbor Pearl Harbor

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (right), strums a pineapple-shaped ukulele presented to him by Hawaii Gov. David Ige at a dinner on Monday in Honolulu. Abe and President Obama visited Pearl Harbor on Tuesday, 75 years after the surprise Japanese attack that drew the U.S. into World War II. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marco Garcia/AP

Diver Sammy Lee, the first American to win gold medals in platform diving in consecutive Olympic games, was also among the country's earliest "cultural ambassadors." Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

An explosion at the Naval Air Station Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, is seen during the Japanese attack. The U.S. is marking the 75th anniversary of the violence that thrust the country into World War II. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fox Photos/Getty Images

Pearl Harbor 75 Years Later: U.S. Recalls A Shocking Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504733373/504733467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Will Lehner, a Pearl Harbor veteran, attends an honor flight trip in 2010. Glen Moberg/WPR hide caption

toggle caption
Glen Moberg/WPR

Pearl Harbor Survivor Recounts Sinking Of Japanese Sub Before Aerial Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504696953/504723738" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The history of the attack is clear, yet the conspiracy theory that President Franklin D. Roosevelt allowed the attack to take place to draw America into the war never dies. Express/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Express/Getty Images

No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504449867/504520453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Local television news displays Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaking to reporters at his official residence in Tokyo on Monday, as he announced he will become the first Japanese prime minister to visit Pearl Harbor. JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images

President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed Congress on Dec. 8, 1941, a day after the Pearl Harbor attacks, to ask for a declaration of war against Japan. FDR Presidential Library hide caption

toggle caption
FDR Presidential Library

Roosevelt Asks Congress To Declare War On Japan

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458824081/458833767" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Edwin Hopkins with his mother, Alice, and father, Frank Jr. Hopkins was killed aboard the USS Oklahoma during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, but his remains never were identified. Courtesy Tom Gray hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Tom Gray

Family Of Unaccounted For USS Oklahoma Sailor Wouldn't 'Let Him Go'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/400167937/400178417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A gravestone identifying the resting place of seven unknowns from the USS Oklahoma is shown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. The Pentagon says it will disinter and try to identify the remains of up to 388 unaccounted for sailors and Marines killed when the ship capsized in the 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. Audrey McAvoy/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Audrey McAvoy/AP