Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari speaks with freed Chibok schoolgirl Amina Ali Nkeki, who is carrying her baby, as Borno state governor Kashim Shettima (C) looks on in Abuja, on May 19, 2016. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Nigerian President Offers Support After First Of 219 Missing Schoolgirls Rescued

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478962832/478962833" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lariat Alhassan had lots of great paint to sell but no office where she could meet clients. And then she heard an ad on the radio that seemed too good to be true. Courtesy of Lariat Alhassan hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Lariat Alhassan

Her Paint Business Was Failing. Would A $65K Gift Save The Day?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478858004/478922799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An aerial photo from March 5, 2015, shows the burned-out school in Chibok, Nigeria, where Boko Haram militants seized 276 teenage schoolgirls on April 14, 2014. Sunday Aghaeze/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Sunday Aghaeze/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) toasts with Britain's Queen Elizabeth II during a state banquet at Buckingham Palace in London on the first day of the state visit in October 2015. Elizabeth said on camera that Chinese officials had been "very rude" during the official visit. Dominic Lipinski/AP hide caption

toggle caption Dominic Lipinski/AP

Sa'a, a pseudonym she uses for her safety, poses for a photo after an interview with NPR. She was one of more than 250 girls kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram in 2014. Sa'a, 20, escaped by jumping off a moving truck. She began studying at a college in the U.S. in January. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Brandon Chew/NPR

From Boko Haram Captive To U.S. College Student

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474702756/474725635" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The husbands ran when Boko Haram took over the Nigerian village of Gwoza. Fati, 22, was one of the wives left behind. After five months, she and other women escaped and now live in a camp for displaced people. Because of the stigma of being a Boko Haram abductee, she says she sometimes is "verbally abused" by other residents. But she's found one good friend. International Alert/ UNICEF hide caption

toggle caption International Alert/ UNICEF

The multimammate mouse can transmit Lassa virus to humans. The virus is likely spread when the rodent urinates or defecates on grain supplies. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health hide caption

toggle caption US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

"Market Symphony" is a new audio installation at the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. The exhibition layers sound from a market in Lagos, Nigeria. The speakers are installed on enamelware trays which are often used in markets. Courtesy of the National Museum of African Art hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the National Museum of African Art

Symphony Of The City: Nigerian Artist Draws Songs From The Bustling Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464883428/465067394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nigerian billionaire Tony Elumelu hopes to create job opportunities by investing in African startups. Above: Elumelu, center right, speaks at an entrepreneurship event in July 2015. Courtesy of Tony Elumelu Foundation hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Tony Elumelu Foundation

To End Poverty, Billionaire Gives $10,000 To 10,000 Entrepreneurs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464603499/464603500" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actor John Boyega attends the world premiere of Star Wars: The Force Awakens in Hollywood. Boyega, the son of Nigerian immigrants, grew up in London. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney hide caption

toggle caption Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney

Nigeria's former national security adviser Sambo Dasuki (center) arrives at the Federal High Court in Abuja on Dec. 14 for a hearing on charges of possessing weapons illegally. Olamikan Gbemiga /AP hide caption

toggle caption Olamikan Gbemiga /AP

Did Corruption In Nigeria Hamper Its Fight Against Boko Haram?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461038854/461206256" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The photographer brings a surreal touch to the epidemic that struck West Africa in photos titled "Le Temps Ebola." The suits worn by the people portraying health professionals evoke carnival masks and animal masks. The question the photographer ponders: "Are these figures here to protect the people or to harm them?," reflecting mistrust of medical workers in the early stages of the outbreak. Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou