Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan declares a state of emergency during a live broadcast on state television on Tuesday. Utomi Ekpei/AFP/Getty hide caption

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NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Nigeria's state of emergency
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A Nigerian health commissioner Dr. Sani Malam vaccinates a child for polio during a national immunization drive in Bauchi, Nigeria, last week. Deji Yake/EPA /Landov hide caption

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A boy works at an illegal gold mine in northern Nigeria. Lead from these mines has sickened thousands of children in the region. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Ado Ibrahim carries his son Aminu through a village in northern Nigeria. Aminu, 4, was paralyzed by polio in August. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Sahya Idriss, a service provider at the health clinic in Minjibir, carries a vial of the polio vaccine. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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At Polio's Epicenter, Vaccinators Battle Chaos And Indifference
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Women and their children wait for medication and instructions on how to use it at the clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. Treating children with high levels of lead is a painstaking process that works only if their environment at home is free from lead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Fallout From Financial Crisis: Thousands Of Nigerian Kids Poisoned By Lead
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A young boy works at an illegal gold mine in Dareta, Nigeria. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Women and their children wait for medication and instructions on how to use it at the clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. Treating children with high levels of lead is a painstaking process that works only if their environment at home is free from lead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In Nigerian Gold Rush, Lead Poisons Thousands Of Children
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