This photo, made available by SpaceX Thursday, shows the company's Falcon 9 rocket launching from Kennedy Space Center's historic Pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, Fla. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Reuses A Rocket To Launch A Satellite

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This is what failed to happen on Wednesday morning. In this image from April 17, 2015, a robotic arm on the International Space Station grasps a SpaceX Dragon cargo ship during docking. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket sits on the launch pad Saturday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX scrubbed the Saturday launch due to a technical issue. The company is tried again — and succeeded — on Sunday. Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket is prepared Friday for a launch at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch Pad 39A, one of the renovated space shuttle launch pads that SpaceX leases from NASA, has been the site of many of NASA's most famous liftoffs. Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images

Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of SpaceX, introduces the Dragon V2 spaceship at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif., in May 2014. Musk predicted during an interview at the Code Conference in Southern California on June 1 that people would be on Mars in 2025. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP