Goldman Sachs Goldman Sachs

A truck burns behind a man perched near a traffic barrier in Caracas, Venezuela, on Saturday. In more than 60 days of unrest, at least 60 people have died in violence related to protests against President Nicolas Maduro. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Fernando Llano/AP

Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein, shown here at a September 2014 panel discussion, says he is pleased to resolve the allegations against the firm. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

More than half of working people in this country have saved less than $25,000 for retirement and many pay crippling investment fees that eat away at gains. Automated financial advisers called roboadvisers offer a low-fee alternative. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Would You Let A Robot Manage Your Retirement Savings?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/445337189/450175859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts, speaks to a group of supporters at a rally in support of Kentucky Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes in June. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy D. Easley/AP

"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down in June. It was a question she came back to repeatedly in an NPR interview on the Goldman Sachs bailout and federal regulation of the financial sector. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Transcript: Sen. Warren's Full NPR Interview On Financial Regulation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/352779367/352925461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ben Bernanke is seen leaving his Washington, D.C., office on Jan. 31, his last day as chairman of the Federal Reserve. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre walks to a federal court in Manhattan with his attorneys Thursday. A jury found Tourre liable in a massive securities fraud case. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/AP

Tom Cruise as disillusioned sports agent Jerry Maguire Sony/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sony/AP

Chris Arnold on 'Morning Edition'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/148600592/148659405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">