Lara Imler has tried to cancel her enrollment on HealthCare.gov, but to no avail. Annie Feidt/Alaska Public Radio Network hide caption

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Breaking Up With HealthCare.gov Is Hard To Do

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A hearse leaves the Deeds family home in Millboro, Va., on Tuesday, after 24-year-old Austin "Gus" Deeds died in an apparent suicide. Don Petersen/AP hide caption

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The House votes Friday on a bill submitted by GOP Rep. Fred Upton of Michigan, shown with Speaker John Boehner, that seeks to ensure Americans can keep their existing insurance plans even if those policies don't meet standards in the Affordable Care Act. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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President Barack Obama speaking at the White House on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Todd Park, U.S. chief technology officer, answers questions in a House Oversight Committee hearing about problems with the federal HealthCare.gov site. One Democrat on the committee called the hearing "a kangaroo court." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius issued a report Wednesday revealing that 106,185 Americans selected a health plan in the new marketplace from Oct. 1 to Nov. 2. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Wilfred Mobley pushes through the emergency room patient at the University of Miami Hospital in 2012. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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September 2010: President Obama at an event in Falls Church, Va., where he answered questions about his health care plan. Dennis Brack/pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius as she was sworn in prior to the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing Wednesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Secretary Sebelius on who's responsible for 'this debacle'

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Marilyn Tavenner, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, during her testimony Tuesday on Capitol Hill. Shawn Thew/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner apologizes for problems with HealthCare.gov

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Gone is the smiling young woman who used to grace HealthCare.gov. Now it's time to get down to work. www.HealthCare.gov hide caption

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More Technical Issues For Obamacare, But Good News For Medicare

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