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What Air Traffic Can Teach Us About Kidney Transplants
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A message from Ashley Dias. Chana Joffe-Walt/NPR hide caption

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Who Decides Whether This 26-Year-Old Woman Gets A Lung Transplant?
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Patient Bob Berquist with Gregory Wagner, a doctor in the emergency department. Berquist, who volunteers at Fauquier Hospital, was admitted for low blood sugar when another nurse noticed he seemed dizzy. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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By Putting Patients First, Hospital Tries To Make Care More Personal
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Douglas Harlow Brown, 80, of East Lansing, Mich., watches birds inside a medical rehab facility. Brittney Lohmiller for NPR hide caption

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Your Stories Of Being Sick Inside The U.S. Health Care System
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Poll: What It's Like To Be Sick In America
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The U.S. Supreme Court building. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Totenberg on 'Morning Edition'
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No anesthesia here: A patient watches his colonoscopy as it happens at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital in New York. Ted Thai/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image hide caption

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Dr. David Gross, medical director of the sleep lab at the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C., says more than three-quarters of the patients who come to his lab are diagnosed with apnea. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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The Sleep Apnea Business Is Booming, And Insurers Aren't Happy
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