Bubbles float over visitors during a New Year's Eve celebration event a Tokyo hotel. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gave a speech at Pearl Harbor about the power of reconciliation in the waning days of 2016. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for the media before a bilateral meeting at United Nations headquarters on Sept. 28, 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Thanks To Russia, 2016 Isn't Really Going To End For Obama And Trump

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The purchase of the Winooski 1 hydroelectric plant in Winooski, Vt., by the Burlington Electric Department enabled it to reach 100 percent renewable power. Russian malware associated with the "Grizzly Steppe" operation was found on one company laptop, but it was not connected to Burlington Electric's grid. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Syrians walk past destroyed buildings in the former rebel-held Ansari district in Aleppo last Friday after Syrian government forces regained control of the divided city. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rex Tillerson, chief executive officer of Exxon Mobile Corp., left, listens on the opening day of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum this past June. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the Kremlin on Wednesday. Putin says that Moscow hopes to restore good relations with the United States in the wake of the election of Donald Trump. Sergei Karpukhin/AP hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russian Prime Minister and United Russia party chairman Dmitry Medvedev visit the party's election campaign headquarters during parliamentary elections. Alexei Druzhinin /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the audience at the United Russia party congress held in Moscow in June, three months ahead of parliamentary elections this Sunday. His party is expected to retain its majority. Maxim Shipenkov/AP hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AP

In Russia, A New Parliament Is Expected To Act Much Like The Old One

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Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the Commander-in-Chief Forum in New York City on Wednesday evening. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Litvinenko, a former Russian security agent, died in 2006 after drinking tea laced with the radioactive element polonium-210 at a London hotel. A British inquiry found that his death was the work of the Russian security service. Natasja Weitsz/Getty Images hide caption

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The Curious Deaths Of Kremlin Critics

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) hosts Syrian President Bashar Assad during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow. The meeting took place in October, shortly after Russia began a bombing campaign in Syria in support of Assad. Putin abruptly announced Monday that Russia was withdrawing most of its military forces. Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russia's Vladimir Putin makes a speech in 2009 after receiving an award in Dresden, Germany, where he served as a KGB officer during the Cold War. Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spy Vs. Spies: Why Deciphering Putin Is So Hard For U.S. Intelligence

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Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov (poster in top left) is a staunch supporter of Russian President Vladimir Putin, but both men have been criticized by human rights groups. Tens of thousands of people took part in a state-sponsored rally in Chechnya's capital Grozny on Jan. 22, with many holding posters of Kadyrov, Putin (right) and Kadyrov's late father, Akhmad Kadyrov (center). Ilia Varlamov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chechnya's Strongman Praises Putin, Threatens 'Traitors'

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Alexander Litvinenko, a former Russian security agent, died in 2006 after drinking tea laced with the radioactive element polonium at a London hotel. A British inquiry found Thursday that his death was the work of the Russian security service. Natasja Weitsz/Getty Images hide caption

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Marina Litvinenko, whose husband died in 2006 after being poisoned, spoke to the media after a British court issued a report saying Alexander Litvinenko had been murdered. Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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"I trust her, she is a very open person," Vladimir Putin said of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, seen here at last month's climate talks in Paris. But, he told the German daily Bild, "she is also subject to certain constraints and limitations." Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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