Malaria Malaria

Fake medicines are a 21st-century scourge, but they've been around for a long time. This advertising trade card for snake oil was printed in New York City around 1880. Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images hide caption

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Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin. iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

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The effects of malaria in the brain are clear: A healthy brain, right, has many grooves and crevices. But when the brain swells up, left, these crevices smooth out. Courtesy of Michigan State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Michigan State University

How Malaria In The Brain Kills: Doctors Solve A Medical Mystery

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A mother holds her ailing son at a special clinic for malaria in Myanmar. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The World Could Be On The Verge Of Losing A Powerful Malaria Drug

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Do you know what the deadliest disease is? Hint: It's not Ebola (viral particles seen here in a digitally colorized microscopic image, at top right, along with similar depictions of other contagious diseases) NPR Composite/CDC hide caption

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NPR Composite/CDC

All folded up and ready to magnify: The Foldscope weighs less than two nickels, is small enough to fit in your back pocket and offers more than 2,000-fold magnification. TED/YouTube hide caption

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A $1 Microscope Folds From Paper With A Drop Of Glue

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Yonta, 6, rests with her sister Montra, 3, and brother Leakhena, 4 months, under a mosquito net in the Pailin province of Cambodia — an epicenter of drug-resistant malaria. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Red blood cells infected with the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Plasmodium is the parasite that triggers malaria in people. Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source hide caption

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Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Blocks The Bad Guy's Exit

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A health official takes a blood sample from a child's finger for a malaria test at a clinic in Bong Ti Lang village on the Thai-Myanmar border. Narong Sangnak/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Narong Sangnak/EPA /LANDOV