No, he didn't repossess this car from a corrupt official. As a hobby, global health avenger Cees Klumper fixes up classic cars. This one is the actual El Camino used in the TV series My Name Is Earl. Klumper tracked it down and had it shipped to Geneva. Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper hide caption

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Yonta, 6, rests with her sister Montra, 3, and brother Leakhena, 4 months, under a mosquito bed net during monsoon season in July 2010, in Pailin province, Cambodia. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Measles, the reorganization of the World Health Organization and the Zika virus could all make global health headlines in 2016. Rich Pedroncelli, Raphael Satter, Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

A baby helps make history. The Kenyan child is receiving the new malaria vaccine — the first ever that can wipe out a parasite — as part of a clinical trial. Karel Prinsloo/AP hide caption

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Fake medicines are a 21st-century scourge, but they've been around for a long time. This advertising trade card for snake oil was printed in New York City around 1880. Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images hide caption

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Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin. iStockphoto hide caption

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The effects of malaria in the brain are clear: A healthy brain, right, has many grooves and crevices. But when the brain swells up, left, these crevices smooth out. Courtesy of Michigan State University hide caption

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A mother holds her ailing son at a special clinic for malaria in Myanmar. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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