A 2014 photo shows a tuberculosis patient preparing to take his medication at Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Hospital in Varanasi, India. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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Chinashama Sainvilus is one of three babies born with microcephaly at the Mirebalais Hospital in Haiti in July. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Doctors Fear Zika Is A Sleeping Giant In Haiti

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A Syrian Red Crescent team works to evacuate the conjoined twins to a hospital in Damascus on Friday. Courtesy of the Syrian American Medical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of the Syrian American Medical Society

Margaret Chan (left), director general of the World Health Organization, is among the dignitaries visiting a military base in Conakry, Guinea, on a tour of west African countries affected by Ebola. Also pictured: Guinean President Alpha Conde (fourth from right) and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (right). BINANI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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WHO Aims To Reform Itself But Health Experts Aren't Yet Impressed

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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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Health workers fumigate to wipe out mosquitoes in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

WHO: Birth Defect Linked To Zika Virus Is 'Public Health Emergency'

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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are displayed at an exhibition on Jan. 28 in Brazil. The mosquitoes can be carriers of the Zika virus. Several cases of the virus have spread to Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Puerto Rico Health Official 'Very Concerned' About Zika's Spread

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A unidentified family member (right) of a 10-year-old boy that contracted Ebola has her temperature measured by a health worker outside an Ebola clinic on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on Nov. 20. Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have now gone 42 days without a single reported case of Ebola. Abbas Dulleh /AP hide caption

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Abbas Dulleh /AP

Measles, the reorganization of the World Health Organization and the Zika virus could all make global health headlines in 2016. Rich Pedroncelli, Raphael Satter, Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli, Raphael Satter, Felipe Dana/AP

Medical workers surround 34-day-old Noubia, the last known patient to contract Ebola in Guinea, as she was released from a Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Conakry on Nov. 28. Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adama Sankoh, 40 (center), who contracted Ebola after her son died from the disease late last month, stands with health officials the moment after she was discharge from Mateneh Ebola treatment center outskirt of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Alie Turay/AP hide caption

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Alie Turay/AP

Transgender performers walk backstage during an event to mark World AIDS Day in 2013. A new WHO report demonstrates extremely rates of HIV infection among transgender women in 15 countries. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Transgender Women Face Inadequate Health Care, 'Shocking' HIV Rates

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Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

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The Ebola outbreak "overwhelmed" the World Health Organization and made it clear the agency must change, WHO's director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, said Monday in Geneva. Fabrice Coffrini /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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WHO Calls For $100 Million Emergency Fund, Doctor 'SWAT Team'

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Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization, has said of Ebola: "It overwhelmed the capacity of WHO, and it is a crisis that cannot be solved by a single agency or single country." Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

Critics Say Ebola Crisis Was WHO's Big Failure. Will Reform Follow?

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Ebola was out of control in Liberia in August, when this picture was taken. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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14 Takeaways From The 14-Part WHO Report On Ebola

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