Community workers build an Ebola clinic on Nov. 8 in Lokomasama, near Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The community decided to organize and fight the disease — building a holding center for suspected cases, enforcing a travel ban. It created a $100 fine for a handshake and a $200 fine plus six months in jail for an illegal burial. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Among the dilemmas that arise when health workers are in their protective garb: What if you can't find the person assigned to be your Ebola Treatment Unit partner? John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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When a high-risk patient is evacuated, strict precautions are followed. Above, aid workers and doctors in protective gear transfer Manuel Garcia Viejo, a Spanish priest diagnosed with Ebola, to a waiting ambulance at a Madrid airport. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

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A licensed clinician is decontaminated before disrobing at the end of a simulated training session by CDC in Anniston, Ala. Training can take a several weeks, making some employers reluctant to encourage their medical workers to volunteer in the Ebola outbreak. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Adrian Hill, director of the Jenner Institute and chief investigator of the trials with an Ebola vaccine his organization developed, holds a vial of the vaccine. Steve Parsons/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Workers wait to spray disinfectant on medical staff after they treat Ebola patients at a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders, in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Protective equipment is in short supply. Here, a Liberian burial team carefully disinfects its gloves before disposing of them. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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A health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering an Ebola screening tent at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. More than 300 Sierra Leoneans have died of the disease. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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A man lies in a newly opened Ebola isolation center in a closed school in Monrovia, Liberia, on Thursday. The official death toll of 1,000 people in four countries is likely below the actual number, the World Health Organization says. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Pajares, a Spanish priest who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, is transferred from a plane to an ambulance after arriving in Spain. He was treated with an experimental drug but died on the disease. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

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AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov

Testing for Ebola, a scientist in a mobile lab at Gueckedou, Guinea, separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate the virus's genetic sequence. Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov

Many people like these Tibetans in Qinghai, China, rely on indoor stoves for heating and cooking. That causes serious health problems. Courtesy of One Earth Designs hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of One Earth Designs

A child is immunized against polio at the health clinic in a farming village in northern Nigeria. The procedure involves pinching two drops of the vaccine into the child's mouth. For full protection, the child needs three doses, spaced out over time. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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